Tag Archives: plastic surgeon

ARE YOU SABOTAGING YOUR SKIN CARE?

Follow these tips from the ZO® team of skin care experts for how to avoid the most common skin saboteurs.

Choosing the wrong products

If you’re looking for visible skin improvements, sticking with a routine customized for you by a skin care professional is where you should start. ZO® Skin Health develops clinically advanced products that work synergistically. Your ZO® doctor will recommend when to use each product, what order your products should be applied, and how much of each to use. They can make the process simple so you will see results.

Skipping vital steps

If you’re getting started on a skin care routine with active ingredients like retinol and glycolic acids, start slowly with only a few products at a time. This will allow your skin to adjust to new products. Once your skin begins to normalize and can tolerate more intensity in the active ingredients, your ZO® doctor may upgrade your regimen. Skipping steps, like not cleansing properly at bedtime or forgetting to use your sunscreen, or not being consistent is going to slow down your progress. Follow the plan designed for you and return to see your ZO® doctor periodically to check on how you are doing.

Not using sun protection properly

Sun protection is needed 365 days of the year, even in winter and when the sun isn’t shining. Most of us don’t use nearly enough sunscreen to get adequate coverage. Don’t get lazy about sun protection or you will reverse some of the benefits you have achieved by using ZO® Skin Health and ZO® Medical products. Sun exposure causes DNA damage that shows up as premature aging. Over time this damage leads to more lines and wrinkles and mottled pigmentation that will make you look older.

Missing out on the benefits of retinol

Beverly Hills dermatologist Zein Obagi is a huge proponent of adding retinol to your skin care routine. He believes that retinol is the cornerstone of every effective skin care program. Ask your ZO® doctor to recommend the retinol that is best for your skin type and concerns. You may start with ZO® Ossential Advanced Night Repair and move up to using ZO® Medical Retamax Active Vitamin A Micro Emulsion as your skin gets acclimated to it.

Giving up before you see results

If you get lazy or give up after a few weeks of consistent use of your ZO® plan, you will miss out on the real benefits. Stick with your regimen for 6-8 weeks and you will see your skin improve. Good skin care formulations are an investment in your skin’s future, and it takes time to reap the rewards. But it will be worth it when you experience the difference ZO® can make for your skin.

Kick Sugar To the Curb

We all know that sugar is bad for your body, your organs, and your overall health. But did you realize that sugar is also bad for your skin and can actually accelerate the aging process?

A huge part of the problem is that too many of us are not aware how addictive sugar is and easy it is to get hooked. Another issue is that sugar is in just about everything. It is even hidden in some foods where you would least suspect it. For example, canned vegetables, tomato sauce, most cereals, sports drinks and more.

When you eat sugar, it stimulates the release of dopamine in your brain, which makes you feel pleasure. The brain recognizes and likes this feeling and begins to crave more. So in this way, it’s a little like crack cocaine!

According to Plastic Surgeon and ZO Faculty Member Dr. Aaron Kosins, “The best way to get off sugar is to do a quick detox program. You may not realize how addicted you are to sugar until the cravings hit you. Once you eliminate sugar from your diet, you will see how much better you will feel and look.”

Here is a list of what you should avoid during your detox; fast food, junk food, processed foods, gum, mints, candy, desserts, bread, sweetened beverages, soda or carbonated drinks, fruit juice, chocolate, granola, cereal, fruity yogurt, ice cream, condiments like ketchup and salad dressings, and almost anything that comes in a can, box or plastic bag. If you can’t go cold turkey and wipe out all sugar from your diet, try taking small steps and doing it gradually.  Even faux sugar may keep you addicted – like diet soda and packets of sugary powder.

Think about healthy substitutes for sweet treats you used to pick up when hunger struck. Choose an apple or a bowl of berries over a plate of fruit-flavored yogurt. Instead of sweeteners, use cinnamon, vanilla extract or lemon zest to add flavor some of the foods you love. If you crave something crunchy, go for carrot and celery sticks instead of pretzels or pita chips.

Over time, you can actually re-train your taste buds to like foods that are not so sweet. In fact, after a little time away from sugar, you may be surprised to find that the foods you used to indulge with are way too sweet for your palate.

 

The M Word

Menopause is a word most women would rather not ever hear. But sadly, it can start in your 30s and last til your 60s in some cases. Among the many changes that women experience during this time are those affecting the skin, and unfortunately it’s not great news.

Menopausal Skin Changes

  • Dry skin as oil glands become less active
  • Skin thinning
  • Decrease in collagen and elastin
  • Loss of facial volume
  • Deepening of wrinkles and folds
  • Increased levels of testosterone and facial hair
  • Pigmentary changes

The best defense against all these changes is a comprehensive skin care program along with sun and nicotine avoidance, a healthy diet, regular exercise and sleep, as well as cutting down on alcohol intake. The healthier your skin is when you approach menopause, the better it will be able to manage the hormonal shifts.

According to ZO Faculty Member Anthony Youn, MD, a board certified plastic surgeon in Michigan, “The key ingredients women should look for in skin care include retinol, antioxidants, pigment regulators, growth factors, and DNA repair enzymes. During perimenopause, we may also consider doing treatments that help tighten slack skin and boost collagen production.”

The ZO Medical range represents Dr. Obagi’s newest thinking in maintaining healthy skin with therapeutic treatments, new protocols, prescription pharmaceuticals and products that treat a wide range of anti-aging concerns.

Your ZO physician may start you on BRIGHTENEX 0.5% Retinol Skin Brightening & Correcting Crème that contains a potent blend of retinol, melanin inhibitors and antioxidants to rapidly brighten and even skin tone quality. As your skin gets used to Brightenex, you may be switched to the higher strength of 1.0% Retinol. Another one of our most popular products is C-Bright™10% vitamin C Serum that gives skin a mega-dose of pure vitamin C to retexturize the skin.

To design a daily regimen that is right for your skin, consult with your ZO Physician.

 

 

Lush Lashes with Ossential Lash Enhancing Serum

What happens to your eye lashes over time?

According to Connecticut plastic surgeon Rick Rosen, “Thinning eyelashes unfortunately come with age. If your lashes seem to have lost some fullness and length, this is a pretty normal occurrence.  Eyelash growth happens in four stages: growth, resting, shedding and re-growth, just like your hair cycles through stages. With age, the eyelash follicles start to slow down and in some cases, they may even stop growing new lashes.”

ZO Skin Health Ossential® Lash Enhancing Serum was created to visibly improve eyelash length and volume. In a clinical study, in just four weeks, 4 out of 5 subjects noticed longer, thicker lashes.

What’s more, this unique serum will not cause a change in eye color, which makes it safe for daily use, unlike some other lash serums on the market. Each evening before bed, after cleansing and drying the eye area, apply the serum to upper and lower lash line taking greater care on lower lashes to avoid direct contact with eyes. Just hold the pen upright and twist the bottom two to four clicks per application and voila! Long, lush, dark lashes can be yours.

Ossential® Lash Enhancing Serum contains a powerful blend of peptides proven to enhance eyelash thickness and length, along with panthenol and sesame seed oil for nourishing delicate lashes.  As an added bonus, it also works to improve the look of thinning, sparse lashes and brows.

 

 

 

 

 

BOTOX® vs. Dysport

It used to be, when you asked a doctor for Botox®, you got Botox. That’s because Botox was first in the market and had no competition. These days, that’s all changing. The FDA has approved Dysport®, a new anti-wrinkle injectible also made from botulinum toxin. Should you ask your doctor to make the switch? That’s an important question, so let’s face the facts.

Dysport is a little different from Botox, but also safe and effective. It spreads a little more after it has been injected. The advantage is that if large areas (like your forehead) need injection, theoretically it requires fewer injections, thereby reducing discomfort.

The best thing to do is to find out what the experts have to say, and ask your physician to discuss it with you. The FDA requires drugs like Botox to carry a warning label, saying that the drug may spread from the injection site to distant parts of the body, and can have serious side effects, such as problems swallowing or breathing. While anything is possible with botulinum toxin, problems are less likely with Botox  when it is used for cosmetic treatments. They’re of greater concern when Botox is used to treat spastic muscles of the eyes and other systemic usage.

Once popular Botox parties are still around. The  hostess usually gets her treatment for free, compliments of the doctor, and the doctor hopes to meet some new clients—it can be a marketing tool. But for the patient, is it worth the risk?  In our opinion, the risk of complication is too high, and doctors should give Botox injections under the right lighting and sterile clinical conditions, and in the privacy of their own office. So skip the parties, and come to the clinic.

When it comes to Botox or Dysport, be informed. Before you make a decision, talk to your dermatologist or plastic surgeon about what is best for you.

Asian Skin—Part Nature, Part Nurture

Asian women are often the envy of women around the world because they tend to look younger than their chronological age. Why are they so fortunate? Asian skin generally contains more melanin, so photoaging is less visible. By avoiding sun exposure, they can maintain a more even-tone complexion and their skin is less prone to the tell-tale signs of aging—like wrinkling and sagging.

What are some of the characteristics of Asian skin types?

  • Sensitivity. Asian skin is susceptible to discoloration from UV rays, hormonal changes, hot water, saunas, and steam. Asian skin also reacts badly to the use of some skincare products, moisturizers, and fragrances—all of which can result in skin reactions, scarring, and increased pigmentation. Try to avoid those products and/or conditions that cause problems, and begin sun protection at an early age. Look out for ingredients like ammonia, arnia, and sodium lauryl sulfate, especially if they appear at or near the top of the ingredient list. If these ingredients are used in minute amounts (toward the bottom of the list), they may not be problematic.
  • Pigmentation. Because Asian skin produces more melanin, it has a built-in SPF that helps reduce sunburns, but this melanin also causes more discoloration. Even though the skin may appear to be light, the melanin may reside in the deeper layers of the skin. This excess melanin can induce pigmentation problems, including sun spots, dark patches, and deep discoloration that is resistant to treatment. Dark spots on the cheeks usually begin to appear in the 30s and 40s, although they can also start to appear earlier. Unfortunately, traditional ways of treating these pigmentation problems (IPL, photorejuvenation, light chemical peels, microdermabrasion, etc.) frequently are not effective, and may, in fact, cause the pigmentation to worsen. Apply broad-spectrum UVA/UVB sunscreen with at least SPF 30 every day, rain or shine, regardless of whether you’re indoors or out, as UVA rays can penetrate windows. Not only will you reduce the risk of skin cancer, you will also help reduce the incidence of pigmentation problems.
  • Oiliness/Acne. Asian skin tends to have unstable sebaceous glands. Sometimes that excess sebum production leads to discoloration and scarring. Proper care and oil-free moisturizers will help. Avoid products made with mineral oil—it’s the oil most commonly found in skincare products. It’s also important to avoid the use of cleansers that contain alcohol, as that may cause skin to produce even more oil. And don’t make the mistake of using overly harsh cleansers—look out for ingredients like sodium lauryl sulfate and sodium laureth sulfate, as these detergents can be very damaging.

The best way to treat all of these problems—sensitivity, pigmentation, and acne—is by stimulating the skin to rejuvenate itself and expedite cellular renewal. All of the ZO Skin Health products are based on this philosophy.

In more advanced cases, problem skin may require medical treatments such as peels and laser resurfacing. Ask your dermatologist or plastic surgeon what the best treatments and skin care regimen is for your skin.