CARING FOR YOUR DRY SKIN

Dry, flaky, itchy skin and cold weather go hand in hand. Winter winds and cold weather leaves skin flaky, red and rough. Severely dry skin (xerosis) can show up on your arms, hands, lower legs, ankles and even your scalp. Dry skin needs more moisture and barrier protection so that your skin’s natural moisture does not escape. Reverse dry skin and restore moisture by: Taking shorter showers Limit yourself to a single 5- or 10-minute shower or bath each day. Spending more time in the water often leaves your skin less hydrated than before you started,…

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IS YOUR SCALP HEALTHY?

We spend hours styling and caring for our hair, but most of us don’t give our scalp the time of day. That’s unfortunate as healthy hair and a healthy scalp typically travel together. If your scalp isn’t in prime condition, odds are your hair is isn’t ready for prime time either. Here’s how to care for your scalp (and your hair!) Go on a shampoo diet As the weather grows cooler and the humidity drops, your scalp and hair will retain less moisture.  Over shampooing will further strip away this needed moisture. During your daily shower,…

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ARE YOU SABOTAGING YOUR SKIN CARE?

Follow these tips from the ZO® team of skin care experts for how to avoid the most common skin saboteurs. Choosing the wrong products If you’re looking for visible skin improvements, sticking with a routine customized for you by a skin care professional is where you should start. ZO® Skin Health develops clinically advanced products that work synergistically. Your ZO® doctor will recommend when to use each product, what order your products should be applied, and how much of each to use. They can make the process simple so you will see results. Skipping vital steps If…

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Skin Care in Your 20s

Your 20s is the time to set up a good foundation for basic skin care and age prevention. In your 20s, your skin is still building enough collagen to keep it supple and resilient. Breakouts are often the biggest concern, especially caused by stress, hormonal flux, late nights out, and general bad habits. Start by using the right cleanser for your skin type, twice daily. If your skin is normal, a gentle cleanser will do the trick while not drying out skin too much. If you skin tends to be oily or combination (some oily areas,…

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The M Word

Menopause is a word most women would rather not ever hear. But sadly, it can start in your 30s and last til your 60s in some cases. Among the many changes that women experience during this time are those affecting the skin, and unfortunately it’s not great news. Menopausal Skin Changes Dry skin as oil glands become less active Skin thinning Decrease in collagen and elastin Loss of facial volume Deepening of wrinkles and folds Increased levels of testosterone and facial hair Pigmentary changes The best defense against all these changes is a comprehensive skin care…

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What is Healthy Skin?

Dr. Zein Obagi first introduced the definition of skin health in 1983 and expanded it in 2008. His definition provides specific, easily recognized physiological, histological, and clinical attributes that can be represented by the skin of a baby as a model for healthy skin. According to the author, skin treatments must correct any abnormality in skin health that deviates from the definition so that it attains the desirable attributes. “Currently skin health does not have a widely accepted definition or model, as it means different things to different people throughout the world. Healthy skin is frequently…

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First Signs of Spring

The first day of Spring is finally in our sights. In many parts of the country, the first sign of tulips and green leaves on the trees with birds chirping will bring a welcome relief from a cold, harsh winter. And the anticipation of spring making its way is also a reminder that it’s time to step up your skin care regimen as the seasons are changing. Springtime will naturally be about spending time outdoors, running, jogging, playing sports and taking the kids and dogs to the park. So your first defense against UV rays and…

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6 Things That are Aging Your Skin

How your skin ages will depend on many factors, some of which you have control over and some of which you don’t. For starters, aging is partly hereditary; that is, your genes help to determine whether your upper eyelids will sag in your 30s or stay perky well into your 50s, etc. Among the factors that contribute to wrinkled, damaged skin include normal aging and the inevitable breakdown of fatty tissue that supports your skin and muscle, collagen and elastin. However, your lifestyle, diet, and other personal habits play an even more important role and can…

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For Your Eyes Only

The skin around the eyelids is the thinnest on the body, and therefore, more delicate and subject to daily damage from UV exposure. By starting to use a protective eye cream as early as in your 20s, you can effectively help delay the visible signs of aging. A good eye cream, depending on the active ingredients, can keep eyelid skin hydrated and smooth. Laguna, California plastic surgeon Dr. Aaron Kousins recommends ZO® Medical Hydrafirm Eye Brightening Repair Creme. “Puffiness under the eyes can be caused by several issues, including fatigue, fluid retention, seasonal allergies, excess salt intake,…

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6 Healthy Skin Solutions for a New Year, New Glow

Have you noticed that you tend to look older during hectic times of year? Stress can show up as wrinkles, sagging, dryness, and even rosacea and acne breakouts. Stress increases the production of hormones that damage collagen and elastin. Too much stress also takes some of the joy out of life–so you’re more likely to frown or scowl, which also induces wrinkles. What’s the answer? Take good care of yourself, exercise, and try to get enough sleep so your body can rest and your skin has time to renew itself. Thirty minutes before bedtime, apply your…

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