Tag Archives: dermatologist

Pack Your Bags With ZO

You asked for it – we listened. In time for summer vacay planning, we are excited to introduce two new Travel Packettes of Dr. Obagi’s signature complexion control pads. Just because you’re going to be chillaxing at the beach or climbing a mountain trail, or having a barbeque in your backyard, your skin doesn’t have to suffer.

According to Beverly Hills Dermatologist Dr. Zein Obagi, Medical Director of ZO Skin Health, “Your skin cannot afford to take a vacation. I created our line of Travel Packettes so that you can take these important skin care remedies with you wherever you go. The end result is that your skin will be clear because you will be able to control the sebum in the skin.”

Welcome ZO Offects TE Pads Travel Packettes

One of our best sellers, this daily leave-on treatment helps target oil and decrease breakouts. It exfoliates to remove dead skin cells, prevents clogged pores and calms and soothes skin that is irritated or inflamed.

These single use packettes in the metallic blue pouch will be a lifesaver. Throw a few in your bag, tuck them into your desk drawer, and use after the gym, of before a night out, the uses are endless. 20 packettes per box

Say hello to ZO Medical Cebatrol Oil Control Pads Travel Packettes

This potent acne prevention solution was designed to be used with the ZO acne treatment program to control acne flares and prevent pores from getting clogged with oil and debris so new pimples don’t have a chance to form.  Cebatrol removes oil, keeps pores open and clean, helps smooth out the surface of the skin, while reducing irritation commonly found with acne or oily skin types.

In a white pouch, these pads come in a box of 20 packettes and are intended to be used daily for best results and as part of a long term acne solution.

 

 

 

What is Healthy Skin?

Dr. Zein Obagi first introduced the definition of skin health in 1983 and expanded it in 2008. His definition provides specific, easily recognized physiological, histological, and clinical attributes that can be represented by the skin of a baby as a model for healthy skin. According to the author, skin treatments must correct any abnormality in skin health that deviates from the definition so that it attains the desirable attributes.

“Currently skin health does not have a widely accepted definition or model, as it means different things to different people throughout the world. Healthy skin is frequently described as beautiful, flawless, glowing, and young, but these terms are imprecise and reflect subjective and non-quantifiable characteristics,” says Dr. Obagi.

HEALTHY SKIN IS NATURALLY:
•    Smooth
•    Even in color tone
•    Firm and tight
•    Hydrated
•    Tolerant
•    Contour rich
•    Free of disease

Dr. Obagi’s goals to achieve optimum skin health include the following 4 steps:

  1. Restore skin smoothness, tolerance, and even color tone
  2. Provide uniform hydration
  3. Improve circulation
  4. Regulate skin cellular functions

 

“Most of us begin life with healthy, unflawed skin, but environmental, internal, and hereditary factors and the normal process of aging proceed to undo what was ours at birth. Over time, activities promoting skin health decrease and deterioration begin. Intrinsic aging and/or photoaging (sun damage) cause anatomical, physiological, and clinical changes. These range from a sensation of dryness and dull, weathered skin to wrinkling, jowling, laxity, skin thinning, and easy bruising. Although these changes may not be detectable in youth, they are occurring and will become visible with age,” Dr. Obagi says.

 

To reverse the signs of aging skin and restore skin to a healthy state, consult with a ZO Authorized Physician

 

 

The Redness of Rosacea

Picture this. Your face flushes for no reason and without notice. Your cheeks often look ruddy and you can see tiny spider veins. You sometimes have breakouts in those areas too. You get flare-ups sometimes after eating spicy foods, drinking alcohol, and when the weather get hot and humid. If this sounds familiar, you could be suffering from Rosacea.

April is Rosacea Awareness Month, which calls out the symptoms of Rosacea to make people more aware of this all too common problem. Rosacea is a chronic skin condition that is often called “Curse of the Celts” because it is common in people with fair skin, and often in those of Irish or Celtic descent. Just a small fraction of the millions of people who suffer from rosacea are even aware of the condition and seek treatment from a dermatologist and even less of them receive the most effective treatments.

Flushing and persistent redness are the most common early signs of Rosacea. For some people, symptoms may only include mild, intermittent facial redness and flushing. For others, symptoms may be more severe and persistent such as redness, pimples and broken capillaries, or thickened, rough skin. Rosacea onset typically occurs any time after age 30. In some cases, it can affect the neck, chest, scalp or ears as well as the face.

Although exactly what causes the inflammation and redness is not completely understood, hormonal fluctuations and genetics, hyperactive oil glands that lead to increased oil production can all be culprits. While there is no cure for rosacea, effective treatments can be tailored to each individual by a dermatologist to keep Rosacea under control.It is also important to recognize and avoid triggers; the activities or habits that can cause flares.  These can include extreme temperatures, sun exposure, alcohol, spicy food, and stress.

For mild rosacea, Dr. Obagi recommends a daily skin care regimen consisting of ZO® Skin Health products to soothe and calm the skin and repair the skin barrier, such as:

If your case of rosacea is more severe, a combination of in-office treatments and at-home use of redness-reducing products can help improve symptoms. The first step is a consultation with a dermatologist, doctor or skin care professional to find out what is right for you.

 

First Signs of Spring

The first day of Spring is finally in our sights. In many parts of the country, the first sign of tulips and green leaves on the trees with birds chirping will bring a welcome relief from a cold, harsh winter. And the anticipation of spring making its way is also a reminder that it’s time to step up your skin care regimen as the seasons are changing.

Springtime will naturally be about spending time outdoors, running, jogging, playing sports and taking the kids and dogs to the park. So your first defense against UV rays and protect your skin from free radical damage is a broad spectrum sunscreen. To insure adequate protection, the general rule is to use a tablespoon of SPF 30+ for your face and a shot glass to cover your body. ZO Medical Oclipse-C Broad Spectrum Sunscreen SPF50 offers daily multi-defense protection. If you plan to sweat or go swimming, reapply your SPF as needed to maintain coverage.

Think of spring as the season to exfoliate and get rid of lingering dead skin cells that have built up during the winter and can cause your complexion to look dull and pale. Slough off dead skin cells with gentle scrubs for your arms, legs, chest, neck and face that contain microbeads, such as our bestselling ZO Skin Health Exfoliating Polish.

For your face, dead cells and debris will come off to reveal softer, fresher, rosier skin beneath with a dose of ZO Medical Invisapeel Intensive Resurfacing Peel.  Use Invisapeel several times weekly, or once per week if your skin is thin or tends to be dry, and watch your radiance return.

Since skin tends to be dry the during cold winter months, switch out the heavier creams you may have been using for lighter lotions or serums. In the spring, your skin will benefit from retinol to help improve tone, texture, fight acne, and minimize the appearance of fine lines and pores. ZO Skin Health Ossential Advanced Radical Night Repair is the pen ultimate retinol serum for daily use.

If your skin is oily, make sure to use ZO Medical TE Pads Acne Pore Treatment to keep breakouts under control, as skin tends to have more oil production when the weather starts to warm up.

Lastly, spring is the ideal opportunity to see your dermatologist for a full body check to make sure your skin is free of any suspicious lesions that could be pre-cancerous or skin cancer. It could save your life!

Get Your Own Copy of Dr. Obagi’s New Skin Care Bible

Dr. Zein Obagi’s original textbook was heralded as a bestseller around the world. Years in the making, his second edition is a comprehensive overview of his renowned skin care regimens and features the cutting edge skin changing techniques that are followed by physicians and skin care professionals in over 80 countries.

In The Art of Skin Health Restoration and Rejuvenation: The Science of Clinical Practice, Second Edition (CRC Press, Dec 2014) Dr. Zein Obagi reveals his new System of Skin Classification that specifically addresses all of the variables in skin types and their expected responses to various treatments, from topical agents to medium depth peels and more.

Dr. Obagi’s range of signature skin peels for every skin type, and his innovative approach to correcting sun damage, controlling the pigmentary system, stimulating new collagen, and restoring skin elasticity are explained in detail. Effective therapies for managing acne, post inflammatory hyperpigmentation, rosacea, melasma and other common skin conditions are addressed. In addition, there is an up-to-the-minute chapter on laser resurfacing written by renowned laser and dermatologic surgeon Dr. E. Victor Ross in San Diego.

With more than 200 illustrations and photographs of Dr. Obagi’s own patients from his Beverly Hills Clinic, the Obagi Skin Health Institute, a presentation of his new breakthrough skin classification system, and a special section on combining laser resurfacing and peels with other techniques including aesthetic facial surgery, this is a volume you are sure to cherish for many years to come.

Researcher, innovator, scientist, published author, lecturer and board-certified dermatologist, Dr. Zein Obagi is the ZO Skin Health, Inc. founder and medical director and is responsible for the development of new skincare treatments, protocols and products to achieve healthy skin. This must-have reference book is an indispensable resource for plastic surgeons, dermatologists, facial plastic surgeons, skin care professionals and anyone dealing with the skin.

Order your personal copy here at a Special price of only $159.96 (20% off list price).

Good Hair Days Ahead

A full head of healthy, shiny hair is a very coveted thing. Stress, genetics, vitamin deficiencies, styling damage, and chemical processing can all contribute to hair thinning over time in women and men.  On average, we lose 50-100 hairs day, which is part of the natural growth cycle. However, if you start seeing more hairs on your pillow, in the bathroom sink, or in your brush, hair loss may be a bigger problem.

Making some simple changes to your daily hair care routine may help slow down hair thinning.

Here are 5 tips:

  1. Use a brush made with boar bristles. Plastic brushes can be abrasive on your hair and scalp.
  2. Switch your hair appliances to a cooler setting, or hold your dryer further away from your hair (6-12 inches). Prolonged exposure to heat can be extremely damaging to hair.
  3. Use a protein-based nourishing conditioner to restore the natural oils that are removed from the hair and scalp during the washing process. Also use only sulfate-free shampoo.
  4. Avoid wearing your hair in a too tight ponytail or using an elastic band that can weaken strands and cause breakage.
  5. Eat your share of green leafy vegetables and Omega 3-enriched eggs. Diets rich in calcium, protein and iron can help reduce or even prevent hair loss.

If excessive hair loss persists, see your dermatologist to find out what the underlying cause may be.

What’s Growing on Your Skin?

As a dermatologist, Dr. Zein Obagi will always recommend that you monitor all the bumps and growths on your skin for changes. Doing a simple body check on yourself at home every few months can literally save your life – especially when you consider that early detection is the most important weapon we have against deadly skin cancer. So go see your dermatologist for an annual skin check or sooner, if you find something that looks suspicious or is changing or if you have a family history of any form of skin cancer.

However, not all of your little skin lesions, lumps and growth are actually dangerous. Below, we have listed a few of the most common things that can grow on your skin but are not generally serious or life threatening.

  • Sebaceous Cysts are noncancerous, closed pockets of oil-filled tissue growths on the skin. They usually feel like large peas under the skin and can develop as a result of infection or clogged oil glands.. Sebaceous cysts typically grow slowly, are usually painless, and have a smooth appearance. Occasionally, cysts can become hard and painful, and they may get infected and require immediate treatment. When a cyst becomes infected it may grow rapidly, become painful, and the skin surrounding the area can become warm to the touch and red.
  • Lentigo are freckles or age spots that occur on the arms, legs, and face or any sun exposed area of the skin.. Lentigos are various shades of brown and have a clearly-defined edge surrounded by normal-appearing skin and a flat surface. Lasers and skin lighteners can help eliminate lentigos. If a lentigo starts to rapidly grow, change color, itch, or bleed, go see a dermatologist to have it checked.
  • Seborrheic Keratosis is a benign skin growth that takes a waxy brown, black, red or white appearance. These are rough growths that can grow rapidly anywhere on the body. Although benign, these can often scare people because they can seem to come up very suddenly, grow rapidly, can be several colors and itchy. Seborrheic keratosis are also called age-related barnacles. They tend to show up after age 50 and are easily removed by shaving and certain laser systems.
  • Warts are viral-caused painless growths on the skin caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Warts can be embarrassing and they can sometimes itch or become irritated. They are contagious and therefore, should be removed as soon as possible.

For more info, visit aad.org

Caring For Dry Winter Skin

Winter weather takes a beating on the skin, leaving  it flaky, red, and rough. Severely dry skin- also known as xerosis- can show up on your arms, hands, lower legs, ankles and even your scalp.  Excessive sun exposure, bathing,  or use of harsh soaps, detergents or chemicals can also trigger dry skin.

Making a few simple changes in your daily skin care regimen and lifestyle can help you to overcome severely dry skin. Keep baths and showers short. Hot water strips the essential oils from your skin, drying out your skin. Limit yourself to a 10-miute warm shower or bath. Look for unscented, soap-free, or mild soap cleansers and body washes. These will be the least likely to irritate and exacerbate dry skin problems. When you come out of the shower, pat your skin damp and then apply moisturizer. Your skin will be more accepting to lotions within 3-5 minutes after washing.

You don’t have to spend a lot of money to get successful results. Read the labels and look for certain ingredients. Ceramides, or synthetic ceramides, helps skin retain water and soothe dry skin. Dimethicone and glycerin draws water to the skin and keeps it there. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is like ceramides and also helps the skin to retain moisture. Lanolin, mineral, and petroleum jelly are other ingredients that help skin hold on to the water absorbed during bathing.

Dr. Obagi says, “Don’t  forget sunscreen when you leave the house. You should apply a broad spectrum sunscreen on all exposed parts of your body. Look for SPF30 or higher, as in ZO Skin Health Oclipse Sunscreen +Primer Broad Spectrum SPF30. When it comes to sunscreen, more is more. Make sure to reapply sunscreen often when in the sun for prolonged periods of time.  Applying sunscreen regularly will not only help prevent dry skin, it will prevent aging as well.”

Use a humidifier at home to keep skin hydrated during winter months. Indoor air is dry so you want to make sure your skin won’t suffer. Drink plenty of water and green tea, and try to eat foods that are rich in omega-3. Essential fatty acids can be found in cold-water fish like salmon and halibut, flax, walnuts, and safflower oil; it helps fortify skin’s natural oil-retaining barriers. If you feel your skin is itchy or inflamed, apply a cool compress or a hydrocortisone cream on the area for a few days to one week.

If you still see redness and irritation, see your dermatologist to find out if there is more to your dry skin than meets the eye.

Why You Need Vitamin D

UV rays are an important—and very efficient—source of Vitamin D, which helps prevent osteoporosis, high blood pressure, and cancer. But you can still apply sunscreen every day, and get all of the Vitamin D that you need.

  • You only need about 10-15 minutes of exposure per day, and that can come through any part of your body—your hands, your arms, etc. If you’re going to be outdoors, you still need sunscreen on your face!
  • That UV exposure doesn’t have to be between the hours of 10-2. Go outside during off-peak hours.
  • You can get vitamin D from a variety of sources,including salmon and eggs. Milk, orange juice, yogurt, and cheese are also frequently fortified with Vitamin D. And you can always get Vitamin D from vitamin supplements.

There are things that we all need to be concerned about, but getting sufficient amounts of Vitamin D doesn’t need to be one of them. Stick with the sunscreen. Are you looking for a good facial sunscreen? Try ZO Skin Health Oclipse Sunscreen + Primer SPF 30.

The Great Skin Care Conspiracy

Sometimes the odds of getting a good product are bad when it comes to skin care. The creams and lotions that claim to clear, lift, firm, tighten, and correct your complexion don’t always do what they say they’re going to. Less than 50% of the products you put on your face actually help you look younger. And even fewer than that are worth what you pay for them.

Why are skin care products so confusing? And why is there so little brand loyalty? Part of the problem is that the last 20 years have brought a tsunami of new skin care products, new ads, and new claims. The splashy advertising, the celebrities, and the offers combine to produce instant hype. Every new product promises a new “advance” or “technology” or “significant improvement.” Because this revolution is so new, everyone—retailers, consumers, dermatologists, editors—is struggling to figure it out.

Some cosmetics companies like it that way. They invent funny names for molecules. They retouch the living daylights out of those “unretouched” ads. They cleverly (yet legally) manipulate the copy. These deceptive practices are called “smoke and mirrors”—a metaphor for deceptive or fraudulent practices first used to describe the way in which magicians make objects appear or disappear. It’s clever, but also deceptive.

It works for magicians, and it works for the skin care industry.

Willing and unknowing customers plunk down big bucks because they want to believe the magic. It’s a national addiction because people everywhere want to fight aging and are looking for solutions.

If you’re going to spend money on skin care products, spend it wisely. Make sure that you’re not being conned and make informed decisions. Invest in products that really work. Discriminate. Know how the channel of distribution affects the quality of the merchandise, and the price that you pay. Understand how ads are delicately written and carefully crafted.