Category Archives: beta hydroxy acids

Back to School With Clear Skin

College is calling your name – and unfortunately, so are stress, sleepless nights, partying, and forgetting about your good skin habits. What comes next? Acne breakouts, pimples, blackheads and more, of course.

Stay calm and carry on. ZO Skin Health has solutions that are easy and simple enough even for an overscheduled student to stick with.

Acne may be caused by genetics or hormones, and usually it’s a combination of multiple factors.   Contributing factors may include diet, sleep patterns, hygiene, lifestyle, exercise, and did we mention stress? If you are not exfoliating regularly because crashing for exams take precedence, dead skin cells will build up on your skin’s surface and inside the pores. These dead cells and debris mix with trapped oil and the end result is pores that get clogged, along with blackheads and whiteheads or pustules can’t be far behind.
To keep breakouts under control requires a 24/7, 365 days/year regimen. Even when you are not breaking out, but have a history of acne, don’t get lax. Stick with a program to achieve and maintain clear skin.
ZO Skin Health makes it easy – even for sleep deprived, stressed out college and grad students.  Try the ZO Skin Health Acne Prevention and Treatment Program that includes:
  • Offects® Exfoliating Cleanser
  • Offects® Exfoliating Polish
  • Offects® TE-Pads Acne Pore Treatment Pads
  • OSSENTIAL® BIO-SULFUR MASQUE
For even more convenience, Offects TE-Pads Acne Pore Treatment Pads now also come in single use packets, so you can through a few in your backpack or gym bag to keep acne prone areas clean and free from oil and dirt building. And the super effective blue Ossential Bio-Sulfur Masque doubles as a terrific spot treatment to prevent pimples from erupting.
With daily consistent use, these 4 best sellers will keep your skin clear and healthy all semester long!
NOTE: If your acne is severe or you get deep, painful nodules or cysts, see a Dermatologist. You may also required medical treatment with peels, lasers and prescription drugs.

Pregnant Pores

Pregnancy is an exciting time for every woman, but along with carrying a new life inside you, your skin, hair and nails experience many changes. It is natural to wonder what you can do about the many changes your body is going through – and what might be dangerous for your baby during these 9 months.

It is well known that some ingredients in prescription medications and from topical skin care products can get absorbed into the body when applied to skin. If you are not entirely sure what is safe or what to avoid, always ask your OB/Gyn or medical doctor to find out.

A a general rule, most mild skincare products found in the drugstore or on department store shelves that do not contain high levels of ingredients regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) may be safe to use. These may include cleansers, toners, moisturizers, eye creams, scrubs, masques, lip balms, body lotions, body wash, hand creams, etc.  But there are certain ingredients that are to be avoided until you have given birth and finished breast feeding.

According to Dr. Rachael Eckel, Dermatologist in Trinidad and ZO faculty member, following is the list of ingredients to avoid while pregnant and lactating:

  • Prescription Retinoids – Retin-A, Accutane, Differin, Tazorac, etc.
  • Retinol
  • Beta Hydroxy Acid/Salicylic Acid
  • Benzoyl Peroxide
  • Hydroquinone

Of course this doesn’t mean that you can’t look after your skin while pregnant, but you may need to adjust your normal anti-aging or anti-acne skin care regimen temporarily. “Instead of loading up on vitamin A based products, switch to a non-retinol day cream or serum. Anti-aging skin care that contain Vitamin C, antioxidants, and peptides are usually fine to use during pregnancy too.  A strong SPF is also essential. ZO Skin Health Oclipse Sunscreen + Primer SPF30 is a great choice because it includes a subtle tint with high protection,” says Dr. Eckel.

Many women break out during the first trimester, which then slows down by the second trimester. In some women, however, they may have acne for the whole nine months. “You can substitute benzoyl peroxide and Beta Hydroxy acid based products with glycolic or lactic acid formulas to help control breakouts. If your skin is inflamed or ruddy, try using ZO Medical Balatone, a calming toner designed to invigorate dry, weak skin. It also removes impurities and balances the skin’s pH,” she says.

Some of the skin changes that occur during pregnancy include pigmentation, melasma on the cheeks, chin and upper lip, moles, acne, rosacea, and stretchmarks. Many of these changes will resolve on their own once your hormones go back to normal, some will get better, and others will remain. The best advice is to wait to see your Dermatologist when you are ready for a post pregnancy skin check. Your dermatologist can advise you on what may require prescription drugs, topical products, or clinical treatments for your condition.

 

How To Wash Your Face The Right Way

Cleansing should be the simplest part of your daily skin care routine. But, you may not realize that some all too common bad habits can cause a whole list of skin problems, including dry patches, irritation, oiliness, redness, clogged pores, and breakouts.

Cleansing before you go to bed is an essential part of keeping your skin healthy. During the day the oils on your skin oxidize, which collects dirt and debris on cells from pollutants, bacteria, perspiration and smoke. Cleanse skin at night to remove these toxins that can age your skin and contribute to clogged pores. Cleansing your skin in the morning is important to reduce oil and drops of perspiration that may have formed overnight. Beware that overwashing or harsh scrubbing can also exacerbate your skin’s oil production, leading to acne.

If you’ve got sensitive skin, you’ll want to use clean hands or a soft washcloth to avoid irritation. ZO Offects Hydrating Cleanser is the one for you. It gently hydrates and rejuvenates without disrupting the moisture barrier. Using panthenol and allantoin to soothe, repair, and restore skin, it sweeps away all the dead skin cells and supports cellular renewal.

If you have an oily complexion, cleansing your skin with the right product is vital to control breakouts. ZO Offects Exfoliating Cleanser is ideal to gently exfoliate and cleanse skin, reduce excess oil and neutralize free radicals from the environment. This bestseller also contains encapsulated vitamin E that provide antioxidant protection and hydration for healthy oily and acne prone skin. The foaming surfactants to remove oil and impurities from the skin, and micro-beads help to remove dead skin cells to unclog pores and stimulate healthy cell turnover. An added dose of beta hydroxy acid (BHA) also help to stimulate the exfoliation process dead skin cells. Plus, this multi-tasking formula helps to boost your skin’s natural production of collagen.

Generally, it is best to use warm water. Both hot and cold water can be harsh on your skin. After washing, gently pat skin dry and leave skin slightly damp.

Skin Care in Your 30s

The thirties are the time when your skin starts to show visible signs of aging. At around age 35, cells get lazy and slow down so they don’t turnover as easily without a little help. Fine lines and wrinkles appear, and skin tone becomes more uneven from daily UV exposure, even if you are diligent about wearing your SPF. Brown spots and wrinkles start to develop, especially for smokers and sun worshippers, and those who have not taken good care of their skin until now.

If you are prone to acne breakouts, you may find that your skin is less oily and therefore, you have fewer pimples, cysts and blackheads. In some cases, acne can continue into the 30s and beyond.  Many women are also starting a family in their 30s, which may bring on another set of skin concerns, including rosacea and melasma due to hormonal changes.

The first thing to do is to step up your skin care regimen and add some more intensive formulations to combat the signs of aging. ZO SkinHealth Oclipse Sunscreen-Primer SPF30 is a great place to begin. This best selling multi-tasker acts as a primer under makeup, and has a sheer, light tint that can make it your every day go to skin saver. Packed with SPF30, it also protects from sun damage whether you are walking outside or sitting in your office all day by a window.

Another handy kit to try in your 30s is the ZO GSR (Getting Skin Ready) System. This trio of essentials will help optimize the effectiveness of your ZO® treatment program. As the first basic step in your anti-aging skin care protocol, three key products are included: Offects Exfoliating Cleanser, to be followed by the Offects Exfoliating Polish, and your new BFF – ZO Skin Health Offects® TE-Pads Acne Pore Treatment to control excess oil and keep skin smooth and clear.

Take on your 30s armed with a super advanced customized skin care regimen to maintain your youthful, healthy skin well into your 40s.

 

Ditch the Dark Spots

Discoloration is a fact of life. The sooner you see dark spots and brown patches has a lot to do with heredity and lifestyle, but by a certain age, we all get some. There are several factors that cause skin to become darker (hyperpigmentation), starting with an increase in melanin, the substance which regulates pigment. Primarily, hyperpigmentation is caused by exposure to the damaging ultraviolet (UV) rays of the sun. But dark spots can also appear due to melasma and after acne or other skin trauma. Of course, the worst culprit is cumulative sun exposure, says Dr. Zein Obagi, Beverly Hills Dermatologist.

Causes of Melasma

Hormonal changes during pregnancy lead to melasma, also called the “the mask of pregnancy.” About 70% of pregnant women develop some brown patches on their face, upper lips, cheeks and forehead, as well as their bellies. Melasma frequently clears up after you give birth, but this is not always the case. Unfortunately, you are not advised to use potent topical formulations containing retinoids or beta hydroxy acids while you are pregnant or breastfeeding. NOTE: Ask your obstetrician or dermatologist what products or ingredients are safe to use during pregnancy.

Post Inflammatory Hyperpigmentation (PIH)

Dark marks from acne can often develop in areas where blemishes have been. The same is true for insect stings, cuts, bruises, kitchen burns, and other skin traumas. These marks often take months to fade and some never fade much at all. And PIH is more common in darker skin types. The first course of action is to avoid direct sunlight during the healing process.

Zein Obagi, MD specially developed the ZO Non Hydroquinone Hyperpigmentation System to treat skin discoloration without the potential risks and side effects of using hydroquinone. This potent system has 5 effective products that work together to even skin tone, improve texture and rejuvenate the skin.

  • BRIGHTENEX
    Skin Brightener & Correcting Crème, Non-Hydroquinone
  • RESTORACALM
    Soothing Recovery Crème
  • RETAMAX
    Active Vitamin A Micro Emulsion
  • Ossential® Daily Power Defense
    Time-released retinol, antioxidants and specialized DNA-repairing enzymes
  • Oclipse-C Broad-Spectrum Sunscreen SPF 50

 

 Spotting Sun Damage

Fortunately, early diagnosis and early treatment can prevent and reduce the appearance of dark spots, brown patches and other signs of pigment changes and sun damage. Uneven skin tone and hyperpigmentation will also make you look older earlier. Apply sunscreen every 2 hours if you will be outdoors in direct sunlight as a first course of action.

Talk with your ZO skin care professional about your specific condition and concerns.

Caring For Dry Winter Skin

Winter weather takes a beating on the skin, leaving  it flaky, red, and rough. Severely dry skin- also known as xerosis- can show up on your arms, hands, lower legs, ankles and even your scalp.  Excessive sun exposure, bathing,  or use of harsh soaps, detergents or chemicals can also trigger dry skin.

Making a few simple changes in your daily skin care regimen and lifestyle can help you to overcome severely dry skin. Keep baths and showers short. Hot water strips the essential oils from your skin, drying out your skin. Limit yourself to a 10-miute warm shower or bath. Look for unscented, soap-free, or mild soap cleansers and body washes. These will be the least likely to irritate and exacerbate dry skin problems. When you come out of the shower, pat your skin damp and then apply moisturizer. Your skin will be more accepting to lotions within 3-5 minutes after washing.

You don’t have to spend a lot of money to get successful results. Read the labels and look for certain ingredients. Ceramides, or synthetic ceramides, helps skin retain water and soothe dry skin. Dimethicone and glycerin draws water to the skin and keeps it there. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is like ceramides and also helps the skin to retain moisture. Lanolin, mineral, and petroleum jelly are other ingredients that help skin hold on to the water absorbed during bathing.

Dr. Obagi says, “Don’t  forget sunscreen when you leave the house. You should apply a broad spectrum sunscreen on all exposed parts of your body. Look for SPF30 or higher, as in ZO Skin Health Oclipse Sunscreen +Primer Broad Spectrum SPF30. When it comes to sunscreen, more is more. Make sure to reapply sunscreen often when in the sun for prolonged periods of time.  Applying sunscreen regularly will not only help prevent dry skin, it will prevent aging as well.”

Use a humidifier at home to keep skin hydrated during winter months. Indoor air is dry so you want to make sure your skin won’t suffer. Drink plenty of water and green tea, and try to eat foods that are rich in omega-3. Essential fatty acids can be found in cold-water fish like salmon and halibut, flax, walnuts, and safflower oil; it helps fortify skin’s natural oil-retaining barriers. If you feel your skin is itchy or inflamed, apply a cool compress or a hydrocortisone cream on the area for a few days to one week.

If you still see redness and irritation, see your dermatologist to find out if there is more to your dry skin than meets the eye.